Excel Training

I have had several requests lately for Excel training, which is great since it’s my favorite software of all time! So, I thought I’d save some of you some emails and re-cap what I can offer.

Personal Training

  • We’ll meet at a library or coffee shop for a personalized learning experience
  • Two-hour lessons: $40. Half-day (4-hour) workshops: $75.

Group Training

  • Have your IT gal set up your conference room, and I’ll come train your staff.
  • While rates vary based on size and needs, ten staff members for a half day generally runs about $300.

Credentials

I have several years experience training adults in the classroom setting and in one-on-one private tutorials. I’m also the go-to gal among all my friends for many of their software questions and editing tasks.

Email me today for a free email consultation to see if I’m a good fit to your learning needs.

 

 

Lori Luza Presents Styles – Austin Adobe Users Group – April 13th

I’m honored to be presenting to the Austin Adobe Users Group on April 13th. If you can, please join us for my presentation on Styles, their uses and purpose, how to apply them in Adobe InDesign, and how to use them to create tables/indicies and cross references.

Join us for the April 13th meeting of the Austin Adobe User Group as Lori Luza demonstrates how to use Adobe InDesign styles, how to create a Table of Contents or an Index, and other related topics like Cross Referencing. Lori Luza owns As You Wish Photography and offers Training/Writing/Editing services through LoriLuza.com. She uses InDesign for technical writing projects.

We meet at New Horizons Computer Learning Center, 300 E. Huntland Drive from 1:15 – 3:30. Meetings and membership are free. To help New Horizons Computer Learning Center reserve a room that comfortably seats everyone, please RSVP at austinadobegroup.eventbrite.com

Lori Luza Presents Styles – Austin Adobe Users Group – April 13th

I’m honored to be presenting to the Austin Adobe Users Group on April 13th. If you can, please join us for my presentation on Styles, their uses and purpose, how to apply them in Adobe InDesign, and how to use them to create tables/indicies and cross references.

Join us for the April 13th meeting of the Austin Adobe User Group as Lori Luza demonstrates how to use Adobe InDesign styles, how to create a Table of Contents or an Index, and other related topics like Cross Referencing. Lori Luza owns As You Wish Photography and offers Training/Writing/Editing services through LoriLuza.com. She uses InDesign for technical writing projects.

We meet at New Horizons Computer Learning Center, 300 E. Huntland Drive from 1:15 – 3:30. Meetings and membership are free. To help New Horizons Computer Learning Center reserve a room that comfortably seats everyone, please RSVP at austinadobegroup.eventbrite.com

Technical Trainer at LifeSize

I just applied for a job at LifeSize (a division of Logitech). If not for my husband’s coworker’s girlfriend, I might never have heard of them. Like most companies in this economy, they don’t have to spend money to advertise openings.

The Technical Trainer role looks interesting. I’d like the chance to work with hardware in addition to software.

One of the things I like best is the company’s open communication on their blog. It’s real and down-to-Earth. Most company blogs I see are just a series of advertisements in disguise. This one seemed genuine.

Most of all, however, I’ve heard good things about the company and really trust our friends who think I’d be a good fit for the company’s culture.

Easiest Applicaion Ever

Staffing agencies websites and big-name job boards have their advantages, but most of them seem to have missed a user-end evaluation. Many of them are (intentionally?) difficult to use and make applying for jobs tedious and time consuming. The worst ones have .pdf forms and expect you to recount your entire career history on their form. Better ones have online forms for the same information. Some really nice ones can pull a traditional resume and fill in all the job titles, date range, duties, etc. leaving the applicant to fill in the details. Since practically all of them also request/accept a resume, this is a lot of—yes, it bears repeating—tedious and time consuming work.

The more annoying—and vastly more time consuming—part is that there seems to be no industry standard. Fields for standardized information like dates and phone numbers could be one field or three. The really irritating ones are drop down lists. I understand they want accuracy, but those take so much more time and don’t allow for exceptions or ranges. And when they use a drop down for industry, that never fits me. Education on those things almost always means K-12 and pedagogy and not higher education and andragogy. Plus, for 4 years, I had two part-time salaried/professional jobs. I can’t demonstrate that on their forms. Each of these time-consuming applications can take up to an hour—-just to copy/paste resume blurbs into a form!

Today, I found a job that is a really good fit for what I do. It came through Kforce and is a “Technical Writer / Trainer” position. Kforce had me at “hello”.

Then, they went on to impress me further. Here is a screen shot of the application.

Kforce Application Screen

See, they get all the goodies they really need and don’t ask for my mother’s maiden name, date of birth, social security number, and current mailing address. I don’t have to worry that they are going to either reject my application for a few blanks or steal my identity.

So, here’s hoping they are as impressed by me as I am by them!

More Than Just That

I have been concentrating my job search on Training, Editing, and Technical Writing. This is where my talents and skills can shine.

However, I see the need to widen the net. While the economy seems to have picked back up just a tiny bit, those jobs are still few and far between. Companies with a little more budget than before seem to still have training/writing jobs low on the list of priorities.

That’s ok in a way. I have a lot of talents and skills and, given training, can perform a wide variety of tasks. I’m honest and trustworthy, too. Not every candidate can say that.

So, when asked, I’m available for training/writings jobs, but also more than just that.

My Story

I thought I’d begin this blog with a little history of me—more than what the cover letter and resume can tell, anyway.

I’m the daughter of two teachers. I was lucky enough to inherit teaching talents from both my parents. My mom spent most of her career teaching 2nd grade and later became a Counselor, working with all age groups. My dad taught high school business courses until he became a principal for a K-8 campus.

My first official teaching experience was when I was nine years old. I had been in children’s theater the year before. During the summer, our theater coach was also a swim instructor. She lived conveniently near us, so I was able to walk or bike to “work”. While she taught the class from the deck where everyone could see her, each of us, as a teacher’s assistant, would work with one child to complete the exercise in the water. With the tiniest of students, we would bob under water and blow bubbles or count fingers. With other age groups, we’d lead them across the pool while they worked on their kick or developed a stroke. In exchange for being the personal swimming instructor for a much younger child, I got free swimming lessons and advanced my own technique and learned some diving and even synchronized swimming. Once I met the age qualifications, I became a certified swim instructor. Many of my summers from high school to college were spent teaching kids to swim.

I was also involved in music; I played the flute. I practiced a lot and sat first chair most years. Later, I also became Drum Major. Both of these experiences required not just leadership, but also management and instruction.

In college, I was lucky to find both the campus Volunteer Services Center and the campus leadership program. I took every class I could (all were free and not for credit) and applied for leadership roles within the volunteer organizations I had joined. The leadership classes enhanced my teaching skills while campus involvement and volunteer service gave me a chance to apply the learning. Just a few months before graduation, I was offered a full-time job with the university. I was responsible for all the training and support for a document imaging system that was implemented to help convert the campus to a paperless environment. While in that role, I pursued a Master’s degree in higher education.

After finishing my the graduate coursework, I took a job at another university’s help desk and learning center. I had a much wider audience to support, so I had many more responsibilities in training and teaching.

When I relocated back to my home state, I did so with the intent of pursuing more graduate work. I earned a College Teaching Certificate from Texas A&M University’s Educational Administration and Human Resource Development department.

In virtually every job I have had, I have written instruction manuals and trained others. I have always been the go-to person for software and other technical questions. There are two reasons colleagues approach me with these types of questions.

  • I may already know the answer or can probably figure it out.
  • More importantly, I’m an incredibly patient teacher. I know that everyone can not do everything. A little help goes a long way, especially if it’s an infrequent task.

Everyone—regardless of age or experience or education—has something to learn. Those who keep an open mind can learn.

Lori Luza